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IQ Biology Blog: NetSci in Zaragoza, Spain

This past June, I had the wonderful opportunity to attend and present at the International Conference on Network Science (“NetSci”) in Zaragoza, Spain. NetSci is a profoundly interdisciplinary conference and one that every year attracts top researchers from a wide variety of disciplines, from Physics to Biology, Computer Science to Economics, all united by a common interest in Network Science.
IQ Biology Blog: NetSci in Zaragoza, Spain

This photo was taken on one of my daily walk to the conference center in Zaragoza, which is an absolutely beautiful place, rich in history and wonderful food.

By Sam Way

This past June, I had the wonderful opportunity to attend and present at the International Conference on Network Science (“NetSci”) in Zaragoza, Spain. NetSci is a profoundly interdisciplinary conference and one that every year attracts top researchers from a wide variety of disciplines, from Physics to Biology, Computer Science to Economics, all united by a common interest in Network Science. I attended the conference with my advisor Aaron Clauset and labmates Abbie Jacobs and Dan Larremore. My three travel companions organized and hosted a satellite workshop on Statistical Inference of Network Models, and we each gave a talk at the main conference. At my talk, I presented our research on investigating gender inequality in academic faculty hiring networks. 

NetSci, in many ways, reflects the sprit underlying the IQ Biology program, which seeks to bring together researchers from all corners of science to exchange ideas and tackle complex problems in unconventional ways. For that reason, I felt very at home at the conference, and I came away with reassurance that our program is crafting the right kind of scientists: the ones that bring fresh perspectives to tired problems; ones that proudly pursue crazy ideas. I was reminded – while talking microbiology with an economist – that inspiration often comes from the most unexpected of places and that the ability to spot and willingness to run with such inspiration is what will undoubtably drive science forward. This is what makes conferences like NetSci and programs like IQ Biology so special, and I feel honored to be a part of both.

Sam Way is a graduate student in the IQ Biology program at the University of Colorado BioFrontiers Institute. He works in the lab of Aaron Clauset.

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